Dr Michael Kalisch

I read English at Oxford and received my MPhil and PhD from Cambridge, spending a year of my doctorate at Princeton as a Procter Visiting Fellow. I taught contemporary literature at Anglia Ruskin University before taking up my current post. 

I primarily work on modern and contemporary American literary culture. My first book, The Politics of Male Friendship in Contemporary American Fiction, will be published by Manchester University Press in 2021. Current projects include: an article on ‘bureaucratic fictions’, which considers how contemporary novels by Boris Fishman, Dinaw Mengestu, and Nicole Krauss portray encounters between diasporic subjects and the bureaucracies through which the state confers legitimacy and legibility; a chapter on Philip Roth and postmodernism in Philip Roth in Context (Cambridge University Press); and a collection of essays on the contemporary Anglo-American novelist Benjamin Markovits, which I am editing for Gylphi Press.

I am also starting work on my next book project, a history of literary failure focused on post-1945 American writing, which will consider unfinished, rejected, and neglected works by Eleanor Clark, Ralph Ellison, Jean Stafford, and Lionel Trilling, among others. My first publication conected to this project is a forthcoming article in Studies in the Novel.  

Undergraduate:

Prelims Paper 1B (Introduction to English Literature) 

Prelims Paper 3 (Literature in English 1830-1910)

Prelims Paper 4 (Literature in English 1910-Present Day)

FHS Paper 6, "Tragedy", with Prof. Laura Ashe

I also supervise dissertations related to my research interests. Current students are working on: James Baldwin and cinema; Marilynne Robinson, Sylvia Plath, and the nonhuman; Bernanrd Malamud and Jewish identity; the Internet Novel; Henry James. I also enjoy co-supervising History & English dissertations. 

Postgraduate:

 B-Course, Scales of Attention

 C-Course option, American Fiction Now

I also supervise MSt dissertations. Current students are working on: History and Irony in Mann, Nabokov, and Bellow; Literary Marriages.  

  

Publications